Keeping Up-To-Date With Your Inbox

As a huge fan of newsletters and much respect for the process, I have to say, opening my email and seeing that crazy number of unread messages is stressful. We chose to subscribe because the information is valuable, it's been vetted, and we respect the unique point of view coming from each curator. For me at least, my email inbox hoards plenty of different types of messages ranging from junk to the most important information. From a honey.com promo code to my sister's "urgent" message to my main source of daily information, it's so hard to keep up!

Here are a few tools and ideas to better organize your email, prioritize your messages, and keep up with your daily newsletters.

For The Junk:

This Unsubscribe Script is amazing, for all my random promotions, junk emails, and random senders I use this script to easily unsubscribe me from any senders that I don't want in my inbox. All you have to do is click on this link, copy the Google Sheet to your drive. Then, go to the Gmail menu in the Google Sheet (see screenshot above) and choose Configure, when you enter your email inbox, mark any of the senders you no longer want to receive messages from as "Unsubscribe."

Just as an FYI, there was a service very similar to this called, Unroll.me. An NYT's article came out and that Unroll.me was scraping users' data and sold it to companies like Lyft and Uber. This script that I linked to is created by Amit Agarwal, a computer science engineer and an expert in Google apps and products. Before you click on anything, I would suggest doing your research. It's your email and it's personal - you wouldn't just give your phone to a stranger.

For Prioritizing Messages:

I think of my email inbox as a reminder area, if there is something that I need to be alerted about that I'm not checking frequently, I'll leave it in my primary inbox area. However, there are plenty of other emails that I receive that I don't necessarily need a reminder for.

Here are my labels, description, and how I filter:

If you need a little help getting started, try using these apps:


  1. MailDrop: MailDrop is a free throwaway email address. It's meant for those times when you don't want to give out your real address. Just give someone any email address in the maildrop.cc domain, come back here, put in the email address, and you can see that inbox.
    (Free)
  2. n8n: If you are looking to utilize your email with your workflow, you could use n8n to automate tasks from email to Trello, Google Calendar, MailChimp, Zendesk, and more. n8n has a list of integrations with the option to create a custom integration. Watch the Video.
    (Free)
    (Alternative: Parabola which is $4 a month and slightly easier to use.)
  3. Notyfy: All your web notifications in one place. This is a browser extension where all your notifications across your platforms show up well-arranged in one place. Clicking on the notification will guide you directly to the notification's platform and its content.
    (Free)
  4. Sortd: One intuitive place to manage your Emails, To-do's, Projects, Sales, Client Service, CRM, and Teamwork ... right in gmail!
    (Freemium)
  5. Superhuman: uses artificial intelligence to automatically triage your email. This is the same technology used by spam filters but applied in reverse. Now it detects and highlights your most important email. Quickly get to the messages you care most about. Never miss important emails again.
    (30$/month with no free-trial.)

For Your Newsletters:

I like to receive my email newsletters in my inbox, always. This is where I get my daily dose of information so they take the place as an important message, located in my inbox. There are other tools and great websites to categorize and organize your newsletters by the day.

1. Mailbrew

Mailbrew puts the sources you love into a single personal email digest where you receive the top posts from your favorite creators. (Here's a coupon code to try it out.) You could connect your account with Twitter (which will scan your followers and be added to your daily digest) or sign-up via email (with the option to connect with Twitter when you build your daily digest).

Pros and Cons

Pros: 

Cons: 

My Overall Rating for Mailbrew: 06/10

2. StoopInbox

StoopInbox helps you discover, subscribe, and consume great content all in one place. Get those newsletters out of your inbox and onto your Stoop. This is a cool app to hoard your newsletters along with finding interesting ones to subscribe to. Is it anything more than a place to find newsletters, no, but it is a great way to have one place for your newsletters. 



Pros and Cons

Pros: 

Cons: 

My Overall Rating for StoopInbox: 04/10


3. Itemsy

Itemsy allows you to save personal links for later. You can also use our browser extension or simply email them to my@itemsy.com, share links and stories, create a private "group chat" or channel for sharing, set up your newsletter.


Pros and Cons

Pros: 

Cons: 

My Overall Rating for Itemsy: 02/10

4. Hey.com

Hey.com has been getting so much hype, I was super intrigued to review this app (along with the awesome push from our readers asking us to review it.) Hey.com aims to change the course of your generic inbox. The idea is that you now have an email (you create a new email xxx@hey.com) where you have consent as to what comes in. Your email "Imbox,"as they call it, is completely redesigned, you can filter your messages by priority. Basecamp, creators of Hey.com, renamed priorities and labels: "The Feed," messages that are not urgent, "The Paper Trail," those messages that you'll never read again, and "The Imbox," the messages that are important. If you know me, this has my name written all over it, I mean, just read the introduction paragraph.


Pros and Cons

Pros: 

Cons: 

When I was doing some research on Hey.com, I stumbled upon this thread posted by Nile from Nocode.tech. Here were some of his thoughts/cons:

My Overall Rating for Hey.com: 07/10

5. Slick Inbox (still in Beta - looking for feedback)

Slick Inbox was designed for newsletters. It's essentially an inbox dedicated to your newsletters - it's clean design, an easy subscribe or unsubscribe option, and that's really it. Some features are coming out that are promising, but as of right now, Slick just seems like your average inbox with @slickinbox.com attached...Let's see.


Pros and Cons

Pros: 

Cons: 

My Overall Rating for Slick Inbox: 04/10 (hoping in the future the rating will go up.)

6. Mux

Mux is also an inbox-esque app made for newsletters. Users can verify senders, easily navigate through favorited newsletters, and an interface made for reading. My first thought is that Mux is combining both Hey.com (consent) and Slick Inbox (newsletter reading), but let's see.

Pros and Cons

Pros: 

Cons: 

Ugh! I know there were a lot of cons, but I'm hoping that Mux cleans their app up. It would be amazing to use this instead of Hey.com and Slick, plus, it would be free (I think.) There is so much to do Mux but I trust you could hopefully work out some of your kinks!

My Overall Rating for Mux Inbox: 01/10 (I'm sorry!)

6. Zenbox

Zenbox is made for remote teams to reduce anxiety when it comes to email. Personally, I'm using it for myself and managing all my emails in one space. The best part about this layout is that there is an actual progress report, focused-reading experience, mark as done or remind me later, and such a clean format, it's awesome. I'm really excited to try this out but as of right now, I really think this is my better version of Hey.com.

Pros and Cons

Pros: 

Can you believe this?!

Cons: 

Wow. Finally. I mean, I have no words for this tool. Zenbox makes it so easy to switch over, it seems like they thought of everything that was anxiety-inducing and flipped the switch. Impressed. My only request would be to fix onboarding which is a minute issue especially because the user experience is excellent. The free version is awesome - if you are remote and want to use Zenbox for collaboration, it's $25 a month.)

My Overall Rating for Zeninbox Inbox: 10/10


As for your newsletters and ensuring you are up to date with newsletters that you follow, see the important content first (the same as your inbox), I must say, the items out there are lacking. Check Listory out and let me know what you think for newsletter and curator up-keep. I would love to know how it compares with some of these other tools mentioned above.


Lastly, your inbox is so personal and it should be a delightful experience, not an anxiety-provoking one. Try out a couple of tools and tips for cleaning up your email inbox and let us know if there are any that we should include in this post.